Radom Pistol Serial Numbersclevervia

Posted By admin On 20/08/21
  1. Radom Pistol Serial Numbers
  2. Radom Pistol Serial Numbersclevervia Numbers
  • It has all the feature of a Radom produced pistol that was assembled by Steyr 1943-45:FB RADOM VIS Mod35Pat.Nr.15567 'P35(p)'. It has the take down latch, blue finish,black plastic grips with FB on the Lt and VIS on the Rt, WaA77 and 'Eagle623 in various locations.
  • Radom pistols, or Vis wz. 35, as they are known in Poland, their country of origin, are currently enjoying a surge in popularity among collectors. While many praise their aesthetics, ergonomics.
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Radom Pistol Serial Numbers

The full serial number on this pistol is located on the right side of the frame above the trigger and on the underside of the slide alongside the breech block. Chennai express watch onlineall softwares. The serial number minus the letter prefix is found on the right side of the slide directly in front of the angled slide serrations and on the barrel being visible through the ejection port. The full serial number on this pistol is located on the right side of the frame above the trigger and on the underside of the slide alongside the breech block. The serial number minus the letter prefix is found on the right side of the slide directly in front of the angled slide serrations and on the barrel being visible through the ejection port.

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Radom Pistol Serial Numbersclevervia Numbers

Had the fortune to spy a war-time production VIS 35 in 9mm at a small pawn shop today. The owner allowed me to inspect internals for matching numbers, and then it came home with me.
Largely considered as one of the best engineered pistols of the European WWII era, the VIS 35 was Poland's ultimate small arms achievement. Though it is uniquely patented, the pistol's design borrows heavily from the Belgian Browning Hi Power. Pre-war production (1936-1939) featured a prominent Polish Eagle on the left slide, and the guns were meticulously buffed and finished.
When the Germans overran Poland in late 1939, they resumed production at the Radom Arsenal utilizing existing inventory. By mid to late 1940, they began making new product. The Polish Eagle was discontinued, and the Germans renamed the gun as the P35(p). Early occupation production had the new designation stamped on the slide, and the pistol retained its features such as the quality finish, the shoulder stock slot in the rear grip frame, and the takedown lever. Serial numbering was changed to the typical German alphabet prefix style. The Nazis assigned the Waffenamt inspection of WaA77 (later Eagle over 77). Final assembly and acceptance was assigned to the Steyr Arsenal in Austria, with Waffenamt WaA623. Magazines featured the inspection of E/189.
As the war progressed, the Germans sought to speed production and cut costs. The stock slot was discontinued. The takedown lever was eliminated, and instead incorporated with the decocking device. The P35(p) was discontinued on the slide, the relief recesses were no longer milled behind the trigger on the frame, grip screw pillar escutcheons were eliminated, telescoping guide rod replaced with a solid rod, and the plastic grip panels were replaced with wood. Outward appearance was no longer a concern, and the polished finish yielded to the rough machined finish. The latest guns were parkerized instead of blued.
For identification purposes of war-time pistols, some collectors will follow a system of Grades I-IV to denote the feature elimination progression. Others identify by the First Alphabet and Second Alphabet serial number series. And still others call them Slotted and Non-Slotted, or Three Lever and Two Lever.
By mid to late 1944, the Soviets were advancing toward Poland, and the Germans began moving the entire VIS 35 production from the Radom Arsenal in Poland to the Steyr Arsenal in Austria.

Can't really say that I absorb all the Grade Types and Sub-variants, so I'll call mine a two lever, d-prefix from the second alphabet, no stock slot, non P35(p) legend, E/77 slide and frame, WaA623 slide, telescoping guide rod, E/189 mag, and nice black plastic grips without screw pillars.
It is an early 1944 gun and has some light high edge wear, a small rub on the right slide, a light scratch or two, and some moderate grip strap thinning. Bore is bright and sharp.
Although the lighting and exposure don't always pick up proper hue in the pics, it's a very nice dark blue with 90-plus% coverage. Machining is crude and rough, just like it should be, and just the way I like it!









My holster is extremely interesting. It began life as M1898 Austrian Rast Gasser revolver holster. It was likely modified in WWI to incorporate a shoulder harness. In WWII, the shoulder harness was eliminated, and the large trigger guard section was reduced to accept the smaller frame of the VIS 35.
This is a very uncommonly found holster design, and I have only found reference to three others with similar alterations.
The rest of the pics, and thanks for looking.
-Matt