Windows 7 Boot Editor

Posted By admin On 22/08/21

Editing Boot Options in EFI.; 2 minutes to read; D; n; In this article. To edit boot options on computers with EFI NVRAM that are running Windows Server 2003 or earlier versions of NT-based Windows, use Bootcfg (bootcfg.exe), a tool that runs on Windows, or Nvrboot (nvrboot.efi), a tool that runs in the EFI environment. In Windows, you use BCDEdit to modify your boot options. To add a new boot entry, open a Command Prompt window with elevated privileges (select and hold (or right-click) Command Prompt and select Run as administrator from the shortcut menu).

This guide explains how to use the BCDEdit (bcdedit.exe) utility for the following Windows versions: Vista, 7, 8, 8.1or10

BCDEdit is the command-line utility that you can use to manage BCD stores on your computer. BCDEdit works similarly to Bootcfg.exe available on Windows XP systems, but with more options available and various improvements.

Contents

  • 1 BCDEdit on Windows
  • 3 More Information

BCDEdit on Windows

You must be logged-in as an Administrator in order to use BCDEdit.

Always create a backup of your current BCD file before using the utility with the help of the /export parameter:

To open bcdedit, you need to:

  1. Open Command Prompt
  2. Type:
  3. Press Enter

When you type bcdedit in Command Prompt, the output is your computer’s current BCD configuration:

BCDEdit on Windows XP

Windows

Windows XP doesn’t have a bcdedit.exe utility available, but the bootcfg.exe utility instead. Bootcfg.exe is part of the Windows XP’s Recovery Console.

Windows 7 Boot Editor

To read about bootcfg, follow our guide: Bootcfg – Guide for Windows XP.

BCDEdit on Windows Vista

To run bcdedit.exe on a Windows Vista system, you have these options available:

  • Use the original Windows Vista installation media to access Command Prompt
  • If Repair Your Computer option is available on Advanced Boot Options menu, boot into this mode to access Command Prompt
  • Use Easy Recovery Essentials

If you have the Windows Vista installation DVD, follow these steps:

  1. Insert the installation media and boot from it
  2. Select a language, time and keyboard and click Next
  3. Click Repair your computer
  4. Select the operating system
  5. Click Next
  6. At the System Recovery Options screen, click Command Prompt

    Windows Vista System Recovery Options

  7. Type:
  8. Press Enter

If you have the “Repair Your Computer” option available, you can access Command Prompt from there:

  1. Restart the computer
  2. Press the F8 key to open the Advanced Boot Options menu
  3. Select Repair Your Computer and press Enter
  4. If Repair Your Computer isn’t available, the recovery tools aren’t installed on your computer.
  5. At the System Recovery Options screen, click Command Prompt
  6. Type:
  7. Press Enter

If you use Easy Recovery Essentials Command-line:

Windows
  1. Burn the ISO Image. Follow our instructions on how to burn a bootable ISO image. If you’d like to have a recovery USB instead, follow our instructions on how to make a recovery USB.
  2. Boot Easy Recovery Essentials from the CD, DVD or USB
  3. Select Launch Command Line

To download Easy Recovery Essentials, click here.

BCDEdit on Windows 7

The options to run bcdedit.exe on Windows 7 systems are similar to those of Windows Vista.

If you have the Windows 7 installation DVD available, follow these steps:

  1. Insert the DVD in the optical drive
  2. Boot from it by restarting the computer and pressing any key when prompted
  3. Select a language, time and keyboard
  4. Click Next
  5. Click Repair your computer
  6. Select the operating system from the list and click Next
  7. At System Recovery Options, click Command Prompt
  8. Type:
  9. Press Enter

If you have the “Repair Your Computer” available at “Advanced Boot Options” (most Windows 7 systems have these recovery tools installed), follow these steps:

  1. Restart the computer
  2. Press the F8 key to open Advanced Boot Options
  3. Select Repair your computer

    Advanced Boot Options on Windows 7

  4. Press Enter
  5. At the System Recovery Options, click Command Prompt
  6. Type:
  7. Press Enter

If you use Easy Recovery Essentials Command-line:

  1. Burn the ISO Image. Follow our instructions on how to burn a bootable ISO image. If you’d like to have a recovery USB instead, follow our instructions on how to make a recovery USB.
  2. Boot Easy Recovery Essentials from the CD, DVD or USB
  3. Select Launch Command Line

To download Easy Recovery Essentials, click here.

BCDEdit on Windows 8

Manage 1 or 1,000 products with inventory management tools. On Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 systems, you need to have the original installation media (DVD or USB drive) in order to access Command Prompt.

If you have the installation media, follow these steps:

  1. Insert the Windows 8 DVD or Windows 8.1 USB drive
  2. Restart the computer and boot from the DVD/USB
  3. Click Repair your computer
  4. Click Troubleshoot

    Troubleshoot in Windows 8 recovery options screen

  5. Click Command Prompt
  6. Type:
  7. Press Enter

If you use Easy Recovery Essentials Command-line:

  1. Burn the ISO Image. Follow our instructions on how to burn a bootable ISO image. If you’d like to have a recovery USB instead, follow our instructions on how to make a recovery USB.
  2. Boot Easy Recovery Essentials from the CD, DVD or USB
  3. Select Launch Command Line

To download Easy Recovery Essentials, click here.

BCDEdit on Windows 10

On Windows 10 systems, you need to have the original installation media (DVD or USB drive) in order to access Command Prompt.

If you have the installation media, follow these steps:

  1. Insert the Windows 10 media
  2. Restart the computer and boot from the DVD/USB
  3. Click Repair your computer
  4. Click Troubleshoot
  5. Click Command Prompt
  6. Type:
  7. Press Enter

If you use Easy Recovery Essentials Command-line:

Windows 7 Boot Editor Gui

  1. Burn the ISO Image. Follow our instructions on how to burn a bootable ISO image. If you’d like to have a recovery USB instead, follow our instructions on how to make a recovery USB.
  2. Boot Easy Recovery Essentials from the CD, DVD or USB
  3. Select Launch Command Line

Windows 7 Boot Editor

To download Easy Recovery Essentials, click here.

Commands and parameters

For the complete list of commands and parameters you can use with BCDEdit, type:

Whenever you are using this utility to modify a BCD store, make use use of these parameters:

  • /createstore to create a new empty boot configuration data (BCD) store.
  • /export to export the current configuration of the BCD store.
  • /import to import a previously exported configuration file.
  • /create to create a new entry in the BCD store.
  • /delete to delete an entry from the BCD store.
  • /deletevalue to delete a specified value.
  • /set to set a new value.
  • /default to specify the default entry.
  • /timeout to specify the timeout at startup value.

For example, to create a new entry in the BCD file to load Windows XP, run these commands:

More Information

Linked Entries

Support Links

  • Easy Recovery Essentials for Windows – our repair and recovery disk.
    It’s an easy-to-use and automated diagnostics disk. It’s available for Windows 8, Windows 7 and Windows Vista. It’s also available for Windows XP and Windows Server.

    Read more at Windows Recovery Disks.

  • The NeoSmart Support Forums, member-to-member technical support and troubleshooting.
  • Get a discounted price on replacement setup and installation discs: Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10.

Applicable Systems

This Windows-related knowledgebase article applies to the following operating systems:

Boot editor windows 10
  • Windows XP (all editions)
  • Windows Vista (all editions)
  • Windows 7 (all editions)
  • Windows 8 (all editions)
  • Windows 8.1 (all editions)
  • Windows 10 (all editions)